Gold Cup Parade

Observed on the third Friday of August in Prince Edward Island, the Gold Cup Parade is a celebration that occurs during Old Home Week and is the largest annual event that’s celebrated in Atlantic Canada. This parade is also the largest parade east of Montreal as it attracts people from around the world. During this event, over a hundred floats from communities, various organizations, and businesses are featured in the parade.

There are local floats, as well as floats from the Maritimes, Quebec, and even from the United States. This day is also a day off for the general population, and a day when many government offices and some businesses may close — although there are businesses that remain open to take advantage of the foot traffic.

The History Of The Gold Cup Parade In Prince Edward Island

This holiday was first founded by Bill Hancox and Frank Acorn in 1962. They created it to revive the appeal of Old Home Week in Charlottetown, in Prince Edward Island. The event was an immediate hit and it’s been celebrated on an annual basis ever since.

The organization behind the first Gold Cup Parade was just a group of businessmen who helped assist Charlottetown Driving Park to organize the parade. As the parade and the crowds grew, this group would officially become a non-profit organization in 1986. The organization now owns the name “The Gold Cup Parade.”

Observing The Gold Cup Parade In Prince Edward Island

Anyone visiting the Gold Cup Parade in Prince Edward Island is bound to see several different things. They’re going to floats of all shapes and sizes, marching bands, people on stilts, and other such sights.

The helium-filled floats are generally clown, horse, or cartoon characters. Many businesses enter their own floats to advertise their businesses. Later on in the day, the best floats are given prizes based on criteria such as most humorous, best overall float, of based upon their size and complexity.

Where is Gold Cup Parade celebrated?

Canada - Prince edward island Show all 1 locations