Day Of The Independent City Of Ceuta

The Day of Ceuta is a public holiday that’s observed annually in the autonomous city of Ceuta on the 2nd of September each year. This holiday commemorates the date when Pedro de Menezes took the city from King John I of Portugal in 1415. This holiday is known in Spanish as Dia de Ceuta, and it’s observed with a wide variety of events that include picnics, parties, and flag-raising ceremonies.

It’s also a day off for the general public and a day on which businesses, schools, and non-essential government offices are closed. It’s also a day when public transportation operates on a reduced schedule.

The History Of Day Of Ceuta

Because of its location on the northern African coast, Ceuta has historically been an important strategic location on the strait of Gibraltar. This has resulted in the city and the surrounding area being controlled by several empires over the last few thousand years. This includes the Carthaginians, Romans, and the Byzantine Empire. During the 8th century, it would come under Muslim control.

During the 15th century, King John I of Portugal launched an attack on the area during a conflict that was known as the Conquest of Ceuta. Afterward, the Flag of Lisbon was adopted as Ceuta’s flag, with the only design difference being Portugal’s coat of arms being added to the center of it. That flag is still used by Ceuta to this day. Under the Treaty of Lisbon, Ceuta would be ceded to King Carlos II of Spain in 1668. The Day of Ceuta was made an official holiday in 1998.

Observing The Day Of Ceuta

Because this is a public holiday, a lot of businesses are closed. However, some businesses such as grocery stores or bakeries may remain open on this day. It’s a day when many people use the extra day off to visit the park or to spend some time with their loved ones. It’s also a holiday that some people use to protest the current government.

Where is Day Of The Independent City Of Ceuta celebrated?

Spain Show all 1 locations