Revolution Day in Sudan

Revolution Day is a protest holiday that’s observed annually on June 30th.  Although it was a holiday that celebrated the Sudanese coup d’etat that ousted the democratically-elected government in 1989, it’s no longer observed for that reason because the government that took power was ousted on April 11, 2019.

However, this day is still a popular day for people to protest the government, especially when there’s an attempt by the current government to hand the rule of the country over to the military. It’s a day when thousands of people take to the streets in protest of their country’s actions.

The History Of Revolution Day In Sudan

On June 30, 1989, there was a military coup against the democratically-elected government of President Ahmed al-Mirghani and Prime Minister Sadiq al-Mahdi. This coup d’etat was led by military officer Omar al-Bashir and he would use his newly acquired power to rule over Sudan for the next three decades.

This coup ended the new democratic system that had been in place in Sudan since 1985. It replaced that system with a totalitarian regime that was responsible for a variety of war crimes and human rights violations.

The government received support from the National Islamic Front and it would use that support to receive additional support from Iran. This support was used to acquire arms purchases from China and other countries. It then used these arms in the ongoing civil war to ban trade unions, political parties, and non-religious institutions. On April 11, 2019, Al-Bashir’s regime was overturned by another military coup.

Observing Revolution Day In Sudan

Since this holiday is longer observed as a national holiday, there are few events except for protests that are currently observed. Over the past few years, it’s been a day on which the Sudanese people have expressed their dissatisfaction with military rule and the government in general.

Where is Revolution Day in Sudan celebrated?

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