Origami Day

Origami is the ancient art of paper folding that’s been practiced in Japan since the 2nd century A.D. It was originally called “orikata” and it was once an activity that could only be enjoyed by the very wealthy because the paper used was out of the financial reach of most people. Now it’s an art that can be enjoyed by just about everyone. All that’s required is some paper and the willingness to learn the art. Of course, anyone interested in origami can use Origami Day as an excuse to start. This holiday is observed on November 11th and is a holiday that the entire family can enjoy.

The History Of Origami

Although we were unsuccessful in discovering who invented Origami Day or when it was conceived, we do know quite a lot about the history of origami. Even though there is little information about origami that can be found before the 15th century, many historians agree that origami is probably an art form that goes back 1,000-years in Japan and maybe even older than that. Since paper was invented in China during the 2nd century, many people believe that origami probably started there and emigrated to Japan at some point.

Origami came to North America after World War II thanks in part to increased interest in Asian culture. During the 1950s, Lillian Oppenheimer helped to popularize the word origami and introduce it to the United States. In 1958, she founded the Origami Center of American in New York and used the fairly new medium of television to popularize origami. Since then, its popularity has continued to rise in North America with a lot of people experimenting with the art form to some degree.

Observing Origami Day

The best way to observe this holiday is by taking some time to practice origami. Go buy yourself some paper, and then look up some tutorials on the Internet. While you’re making paper swans, ducks, and elephants, don’t forget to use the hashtag #OrigamiDay on your social media posts for the day. And don’t forget to include a picture of what you’ve created.

Where is Origami Day celebrated?

There is no specific location where this holiday is celebrated.
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